BeautyPill

Alina’s Advice As A Beauty Advocate

Poly-Unsaturated Fats, Fatty Acids, and Essential Fatty Acids August 18, 2008

The Truth About Fat

Fats are broken down into 3 categories:

1. Saturated fats

2. Mono-unsaturated fats

3. Poly-unsaturated fats (this includes Omega 3 and Omega 6 essential fatty acids [EFAs])

Let’s take a look at:

Poly-Unsaturated Fats, Fatty Acids, and Essential Fatty Acids

The key roles that fat plays in your body are in the breakdown for their fatty acids and in energy.

Fatty acids are vital to your health and well being. Fatty acids are the acids that are produced when fat is broken down. Your body uses fatty acids to perform key functions in your body which involve the brain, eyes, heart, lungs, nerves, skin, hair, digestion, and hormones.

Your body also burns fat for energy. The extra energy that is not burned or used in your body is stored in adipose tissue. Adipose then protects and cushions the organs in your body. The “fat” that many people dislike on their bodies (in the form of love handles, big thighs, or flabby bellies) is not fat per se, it’s adipose tissue.

The human body can produce all but 2 of the fatty acids it needs. These 2 fatty acids are linoleic acid (LA acid), which is the “parent” fatty acid to the Omega 6 family) and alpha-linolenic acid (ALA acid) which is the “parent” fatty acid in the Omega 3 family.

Essential fatty acids (EFA’s) . When the word “essential” is used in a nutrition context, it refers to something that body cannot make on its own and must find from outside sources – i.e., your diet.

Foods High in Omega 3 include:

  • Flax seeds
  • Cold water fish such as salmon, herring, mackerel
  • Sardines

Foods High in Omega 6 include:

  • Sunflower seeds
  • Vegetable oils such as corn, sunflower, sesame, soybean, safflower
  • Margarine
  • Pumpkin seeds

And then of course there are Essential Fatty Acid Supplements in pill form – stay tuned for info on the doctor recommended EFAs to supplement your diet!

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The Skinny on Your Fat August 12, 2008

Your body produces new fat cells only until you reach your early teenage years! During puberty, fat cell production ceases and that’s it – that’s the total number of fat cells you are stuck with for life. Then, when you gain or lose weight, your body doesn’t make new fat cells, rather the fat cells that have been produced in your childhood increase as you gain weight or decrease as you lose weight.

When you diet, exercise or use any other weight loss method, your body burns fat for energy – decreasing the size (not the amount) of your already existing fat cells. Extra energy not burned or used in your body (like when you skip the gym) is stored in adipose tissue. Adipose protects and cushions the organs in your body. The “fat” that many people dislike on their bodies (in the form of love handles, big thighs, or flabby bellies) is not fat per se, it’s adipose tissue.

Presently, liposuction is the only FDA-approved way to remove or destroy adipose, i.e., fat cells. Therefore, the best candidate for liposuction is someone who has one or more areas of fat collections (reserves, bulges, rolls, or whatever other unpleasant term you prefer) that are disproportionate to the rest of their body. Any other diet or weight loss method can only shrink the size of your existing fat cells.

Since liposuction physically removes adipose, post-liposuction weight fluctuation – loss or gain, is less apparent in the treated area. However, if you gain considerable weight, those untreated areas may suffer by gaining more fat since there are physically more fat cells there. Therefore, if you remove fat via liposuction – after the procedure you will gain and lose weight proportionally with all the fat cells that are left in your body – in other words, if your weight gain used to go to your thighs and after lipo those fat cells are no longer there – your body will distribute them evenly throughout the rest of the fat cells in your body.

So beware! Weight gain post-lipo may create new and undesirable “problem areas” that you never knew you had!

 

More Tips of the Day – Diet Grocery Shopping ii August 9, 2008

Chose Heart Health Foods!

  • Buy lots of fruits and veggies!
    • Fruits and vegetables are high in dietary fiber, which can aid in lowering cholesterol levels.
  • Buy whole grains!
    • Nutrients in whole grains promote heart health.
    • Replace white bread, flour, pasta, and rice with their whole grains alternative.
    • Chose whole-grain breads, whole-wheat pasta, whole-wheat pasta, and brown rice.
  • Beware of Energy or Nutritional Bars!
    • Many energy and nutritional bars contain trans fat! Even if they are labeled “trans fat free,” don’t forget to check the label – manufactures are allowed to use this label even when there is ½ a gram of trans-fat or less – that may seem small, but it can add up, especially if the “nutritional” bar has more than 1 serving (your may be unknowingly eating 2 or 3 grams of trans fat in every bar).
  • Purchase oil that has processed to a minimal degree.
    • To do this, look for oils that have been “cold expeller pressed” and “extra virgin.” These processes ensure minimal damage.
  • Make your own salad dressing!
    • Using pure olive oil instead of buying readymade salad dressings. Many readymade salad dressings are made with damaged, over processed and inferior oils.
    • Or, simply squeeze a lemon as your dressing! Or try a splash of vinegar – red wine or balsamic. That way you will cut out all fat, but still have the flavor.
    • Using lemon is also a great alternative to salt.
  • Avoid animal fat. The highest concentration of toxins in animals is found in their fat.
    • If you do buy animal meat products that are high in fat, buy organic. Look for products labeled “organic” as well as products produced with “no antibiotics, no added growth hormones and no dangerous pesticides.” Organic refers to the way foods are produced and processed without chemical pesticides and fertilizers. Since the animal fat has the highest concentration of toxins found in the animal, at least if you are eating animal fat, the toxins you are ingested will be limited.
  • Buy organic dairy. For the same reasons as listed above.
  • Avoid buying full-fat options if there are reduced-fat, low-fat or non-fat options available.
    • Especially for dairy including milk and cheese.
 

The New Face Lift August 8, 2008

I LOVE this quote: “Plastic surgery should whisper, not scream. Today, instead of tightening the neck, there is a re-suspending of the muscles in the face,” said Dr. Darrick Antell, a New York City plastic surgeon.

The face lift trends of today are more about re-filling and re-surfacing – and much less about tightening, pulling and tucking the skin. “The result is a much more natural look that’s fresher and younger, rather than lifts of days gone by that scream tight, frozen, and emotionless (think Joan Rivers!). Although personally, while I think the naturalization of face lifts is great; the overabundance of Botox is filling in for the tight, taut, frozen look.

So smaller, more frequent, nips and fills are being replaced by the grand face lifts of yesterday. The other benefit of this is the recovery time, since there are less bruising and lower complication rates.

The “midface” is the focus – the midface starts at the corners of your mouth, up diagonally towards the corners of your eyes. Think *cheekbones.*

When your face ages, fat is loosening and descending to sit lower in your face, resulting in facial features that look longer and squarer in shape. Younger faces tend to look angular or tapered. That’s why the most important aspect of a facelift is to improve facial shape while limiting signs that a surgical procedure has been performed. How do you do this? By manipulating both fat and muscle – the focus has significantly moved away from skin tension (although of course it is still important – no one wants a sagging face plumped with fat) and concentrates on contouring the face.

The best plastic surgeons are the ones that have mastered manipulating both the muscle and the fat in the face. The muscle in the face (musculoaponeurotic system [SMAS]) is addressed by repositioning underlying facial muscles as well as reducing excess skin. Fat and tissue contribute almost equally to your facial appearance as does the underlying muscle and the overlying skin. So depending on your face, fat will have to be added (via a fat transfer), reduced, or redistributed.

On the Upper East Side of Manhattan, Dr. David Rosenberg, a plastic surgeon, has a goal for the face lifts he performs – to give his patients “an age appropriate rejuvenation where they look absolutely fabulous for their age.” Dr Rosenberg continues, “It’s not as much a pulling back of the skin as it is a muscle correction. In the cheek, I go under the fat pad and re-support it to a place where it was earlier in time to recreate a younger looking cheek. I go under the muscles along the jaw line and neck, and re-support them back to a more youthful position.”

Current reports are saying face lifts are up 14% this year. What do you think? Are you one of the people that will inflate these statistics in the years to come?